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How To Image Jupiter

Monday, May 28th 2018 03:11 PM

  After stargazing and exploring the night sky and its planets countless times... Jupiter, our Solar System's largest planet, has peaked your interest and you've decided that you're ready to tackle the rewarding process of Planetary Imaging. We understand that the process may seem slightly confusing and tedious, but capturing Jupiter's vibrant bands, massive Red Spot, and its four bright moons makes it all worthwhile. With many factors to consider such as location and equipment for the right approach to capturing a good-quality image you're probably thinking "Where do I start?". Follow this step-by-step guide on How To Image Jupiter and you will be well on your way to becoming an expert! | WHEN AND WHERE |  An important factor to consider when shooting Jupiter is its location in the sky. When it has just come up over the horizon, you will be observing it through a lot more of Earth's atmosphere than if it were up higher in the sky. So don't try...

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The Sun’s corona, invisible to the human eye except when it appears briefly as a fiery halo of plasma during a solar eclipse, remains a puzzle even to scientists who study it closely. Beginning 1,300 miles from the Sun’s surface and extending millions more in every direction, it is more than a hundred times hotter than lower layers much closer to the fusion reactor at the Sun’s core. A team of physicists at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) led by Gregory Fleishman, has recently discovered a phenomenon that may begin to untangle what they call “one of the greatest challenges for solar modeling” – determining the physical mechanisms that heat the upper atmosphere to 1 million degrees Fahrenheit and higher. Their findings, which account for previously undetected thermal energy in the corona, were recently published in the 123-year-old Astrophysical Journal, whose editors have included foundational space scientists such...

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How to Calculate Telescope Magnification

Saturday, March 31st 2018 11:44 AM




What are Eyepiece Filters Video

Saturday, March 31st 2018 11:42 AM




Bizarre Stunted Galaxy Found in Our Own Cosmic Backyard

Thursday, March 15th 2018 02:04 PM

The odd galaxy, called NGC 1277, doesn't appear to have evolved much in the past 10 billion years, a new study reports. Learning about its history should shed light on galaxy formation and evolution in general, study team members said. NGC 1277, which is located about 240 million light-years away from Earth, is called a "red and dead" galaxy because it doesn't have enough fuel to produce new stars. That wasn't always the case, however. Shortly after the galaxy was formed, it produced stars 1,000 times faster than they are formed today in our Milky Way, the researchers said. [Gallery: 65 All-Time Great Galaxy Hits]     Credit: M. Beasley(Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias)/NASA/ESA Astronomers think the key to NGC 1277's development lies in its globular clusters, which are groups of stars. Large galaxies typically have two types of clusters: metal poor, which appear blue, and metal rich, which appear red. (In astronomical parlance, a metal is any elemen...

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Bizarre Stunted Galaxy Found in Our Own Cosmic Backyard

Thursday, March 15th 2018 02:04 PM

The odd galaxy, called NGC 1277, doesn't appear to have evolved much in the past 10 billion years, a new study reports. Learning about its history should shed light on galaxy formation and evolution in general, study team members said. NGC 1277, which is located about 240 million light-years away from Earth, is called a "red and dead" galaxy because it doesn't have enough fuel to produce new stars. That wasn't always the case, however. Shortly after the galaxy was formed, it produced stars 1,000 times faster than they are formed today in our Milky Way, the researchers said. [Gallery: 65 All-Time Great Galaxy Hits]     Credit: M. Beasley(Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias)/NASA/ESA Astronomers think the key to NGC 1277's development lies in its globular clusters, which are groups of stars. Large galaxies typically have two types of clusters: metal poor, which appear blue, and metal rich, which appear red. (In astronomical parlance, a metal is any elemen...

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Gravity Assist Podcast: Pluto, with Alan Stern

Thursday, March 15th 2018 02:00 PM

  Jim Green: Just a few years ago we knew virtually nothing about Pluto, but in July 2015 New Horizons changed all that when it flew by the dwarf planet. What were the biggest surprises, Alan   Alan Stern: I think my two biggest surprises were first, just how utterly amazing Pluto turned out to be — how many different kinds of features were on the surface and even in the atmosphere. There was something for everyone. And the second amazing finding was how many members of the public really wanted to participate in it and just be a part of this exploration. We expected it would be a big response, but it was much bigger than we thought. I would say for at least a year afterwards there was this completely unparalleled public reaction that our team members would [receive when] going places; we were getting requests for literally hundreds of public presentations. We just couldn't fulfill it all.   Jim Green: I think some of that is still going on. Wh...

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Gravity Assist Podcast: Venus, with David Grinspoon

Tuesday, March 6th 2018 03:12 PM

The Gravity Assist Podcast is hosted by NASA's Director of Planetary Science, Jim Green, who each week talks to some of the greatest planetary scientists on the planet, giving a guided tour through the Solar System and beyond in the process. This week, he spoke to astrobiologist and planetary scientist David Grinspoon, of the Planetary Science Institute, about the second planet from the Sun: Venus, a world with surface temperatures hot enough to melt lead. As part of the discussion, they talk about Venus' volcanoes, its clouds of sulfuric acid and its runaway greenhouse effect. Was Venus once like Earth and what clues might it provide about the future of our own planet? They also explore Venus' backward rotation and its 'forever sunsets', plus the remarkable and heroic 'Apollo 11'-like story of the Akatsuki spacecraft.  You can listen to the full podcast here, or read the transcript below.   David, you did some early work on Venus for your PhD. What was that...

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Gravity Assist Podcast: Venus, with David Grinspoon

Tuesday, March 6th 2018 03:11 PM

The Gravity Assist Podcast is hosted by NASA's Director of Planetary Science, Jim Green, who each week talks to some of the greatest planetary scientists on the planet, giving a guided tour through the Solar System and beyond in the process. This week, he spoke to astrobiologist and planetary scientist David Grinspoon, of the Planetary Science Institute, about the second planet from the Sun: Venus, a world with surface temperatures hot enough to melt lead. As part of the discussion, they talk about Venus' volcanoes, its clouds of sulfuric acid and its runaway greenhouse effect. Was Venus once like Earth and what clues might it provide about the future of our own planet? They also explore Venus' backward rotation and its 'forever sunsets', plus the remarkable and heroic 'Apollo 11'-like story of the Akatsuki spacecraft.  You can listen to the full podcast here, or read the transcript below.   David, you did some early work on Venus for your PhD. What was that...

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When a moon passes in front of a star — also known an occultation — it temporarily blocks the star's light, giving researchers a unique opportunity to study the profile of the object in the foreground.      On Oct. 5, 2017, Triton passed in front of a distant star called UCAC4 410-143659, which is in the constellation of Aquarius. Using data from the Gaia spacecraft, the researchers were able to narrow down the best locations to observe this rare occultation and learn more about Triton. [Neptune's Biggest (but Odd) Moon: Triton]   The Gaia spacecraft is used to make precise measurements of the positions of more than a billion stars. In this case, the researchers wanted to pinpoint the specific path that the moon's shadow would follow as it swept across our planet. Previous observations showed that within less than 3 minutes, the occultation would first cross Europe and North Africa, before moving toward North America, according t...

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