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Takahashi 20% Off FC-100 OTAs Is Almost Over

Thursday, November 16th 2017 12:44 PM

That's Right, It Is A Great Time To Buy A Tak.Takahashi. Its name is synonymous with optical perfection. The Takahashi line of telescopes has a revered presence with astronomers around the world, and one particular model is now on sale. The FC-100D hearkens back to the Fluorite legends of Takahashi doublets. The models that many astronomers lusted after while flipping through the pages of Sky and Telescope and Astronomy Magazine. Well now you can have legendary performance at a savings of 20%. (This sale is for the optical tube only. The mount and various accessories are not included.) The Takahashi FC-100D comes in three different flavors.The FC-100DC model features a fixed dew shield and a 2.2inch rack and pinion focuser. While a capable imaging instrument, it is designed with the visual observer in mind.Was $2230 now $1784Of you can pick the DF series if you tend to lean more towards Astrophotograhy.The FC-100DF is optically identical to the DC model, but features an enhanced...

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Results from October’s Triton Cover-Up

Thursday, November 16th 2017 10:12 AM

For those of us who keep track of where and when solar-system objects occult a background star, the brief cover-up of a dim star in Aquarius by Neptune’s large moon Triton on October 5th was especially newsworthy. The path of Triton's stellar occultation on October 5 passed over many observing stations. Bruno Sicardy / Observatoire de Paris The target, 12.6-magnitude star UCAC4 410-143659, was the brightest star occulted by Triton since 1997. It’s about a magnitude brighter than Triton itself, and its location only 13 arcseconds from 8th-magnitude Neptune made observations relatively easy. The 1997 occultation, and some of the faint stars occulted a few years later, had shown that Triton experienced significant global warming since the Voyager 2 flyby in 1989. New observations would determine if the trend had continued. Observers recorded the October 5th event from more than 65 stations in Europe, the UK, northern Africa, and the United Stat...

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  The Hubble Space Telescope is famous for bringing us detailed images from the depths of the universe. So, it's easy to assume that the telescope would have little difficulty imaging exoplanets in our own galaxy. The folks that run Hubble understand this perspective, and their new video discusses exactly how the telescope can help explore those planets, revealing that these techniques do have limitations.     Planets do not emit their own light, making them more difficult than stars to study from Earth. What's more, planets are miniscule compared to the stars they orbit. However, when an exoplanet passes between its star and Earth, a tiny fraction of the star's light passes through the planet's atmosphere. This brief glimpse into exoplanets' atmospheres can provide astronomers a wealth of information about the composition, thickness and temperature of the gases that surround the planet, according to the European Space Agency video, part of th...

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Save Now on CPC Series

Wednesday, November 15th 2017 09:46 AM




Celestron SALE! Up to $400 OFF

Wednesday, November 15th 2017 09:18 AM

The Legacy An Empire Was Built On Is Now On Sale! The Celestron Schmidt-Cassegrain, a true titan in astronomy is now on sale.   Celestron decided they were going to come out strong, really strong with their sale prices.  You will save up to $400 on the CPC series scopes, even a little more if you take advantage of the Cloudy Nights discount.  This rebate includes the class leading EdgeHD series as well.   The Celestron CPC Deluxe EdgeHD telescope has the most talked-about improvement in optics in years – Celestron’s EdgeHD flat field optical system – a Sky & Telescope Hot Product for 2010. With Celestron’s renowned Starbright XLT multicoatings on every optical surface, the EdgeHD optics give you maximum light throughput across the widest possible visual and photographic spectrum. The CPC Deluxe EdgeHD’s light grasp can reveal to you star clusters, nebulas, planets, and galaxies in amazing visu...

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A new, low-cost attachment to telescopes allows previously unachievable precision in ground-based observations of exoplanets -- planets beyond our solar system. With the new attachment, ground-based telescopes can produce measurements of light intensity that rival the highest quality photometric observations from space. Penn State astronomers, in close collaboration with the nanofabrication labs at RPC Photonics in Rochester, New York, created custom "beam-shaping" diffusers -- carefully structured micro-optic devices that spread incoming light across an image -- that are capable of minimizing distortions from the Earth's atmosphere that can reduce the precision of ground-based observations.  Left: Light from a laser pointer is shaped into a wide and stable output using a beam-shaping diffuser. A carefully designed pattern is precisely molded into plastic polymers or directly into a glass substrate, creating micro-structures on the surface of the diffuser (inset; image credit:...

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Lunar Eclipses: What Are They & When Is the Next One?

Tuesday, November 14th 2017 09:40 AM

Lunar eclipses occur when Earth's shadow blocks the sun's light, which otherwise reflects off the moon. There are three types — total, partial and penumbral — with the most dramatic being a total lunar eclipse, in which Earth's shadow completely covers the moon. The next lunar eclipse will be a total lunar eclipse on Jan. 31, 2018. Throughout history, eclipses have inspired awe and even fear, especially when total lunar eclipses turned the moon blood-red, an effect that terrified people who had no understanding of what causes an eclipse and therefore blamed the events on this god or that. Below, you'll find the science and history of lunar eclipses, learn how they work, and see a list of the next ones on tap.   When is the next lunar eclipse? The last lunar eclipse was on August 7, 2017. It was a partial lunar eclipse. Here is a schedule of upcoming lunar eclipses: January 31, 2018: Total eclipse. Visible from Asia, Australia, Pacific Ocean, western...

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  NASA has provided an update on the first integrated launch of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft after completing a comprehensive review of the launch schedule. This first un-crewed mission, known as Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) is a critical flight test for NASA's human deep space exploration goals. EM-1 lays the foundation for the first crewed flight of SLS and Orion, as well as a regular cadence of missions thereafter near the Moon and eventually to the asteroids and Mars.The review follows an earlier assessment where NASA evaluated the cost, risk, and technical factors of adding crew to the mission, but ultimately affirmed the original plan to fly EM-1 un-crewed. NASA initiated this review as a result of the crew study and challenges related to building the core stage of the world's most powerful rocket for the first time, issues with manufacturing and supplying Orion's first European service module, and tornado damage at the agency's Michoud Assembly...

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This Saturday (Nov. 11), the bright star Regulus will briefly disappear behind the last-quarter moon, providing a treat for skywatchers across North and Central America.   This will be the second time in less than a month that this particular star has appeared to pass behind the moon in the sky, in an event known as a lunar occultation. On the morning of Oct. 15, Regulus spent up to 70 minutes behind the moon from our perspective on Earth. But Regulus isn't the only bright star to have spent some time lurking behind the moon lately — last Sunday (Nov. 5), the nearly full moon also occulted the orange star Aldebaran.   While the last two occultations coincided with dark skies, Saturday's occultation of Regulus will happen after sunrise. This means that it will be a bit more difficult to see and photograph. However, skywatchers who are lucky enough to experience clear skies that morning will get a rare, blue backdrop for the celestial sight. [Best Night...

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  Flit, zip, jitter, boom. Quarks, the tiny particles that make up everything tangible in the universe, remain deeply mysterious to physicists even 53 years after scientists first began to suspect these particles exist. They bop around at the edge of scientific instruments' sensitivities, are squirreled away inside larger particles, and decay from their higher forms into their simplest in half the time it takes a beam of light to cross a grain of salt. The little buggers don't give up their secrets easily. That's why it took more than five decades for physicists to confirm the existence of an exotic particle they've been hunting since the beginning of quark science: the massive (at least in subatomic particle terms), elusive tetraquark. Physicists Marek Karliner of Tel Aviv University and Jonathan Rosner of the University of Chicago have confirmed that the strange, massive tetraquark can exist in its purest, truest form: four particles, all interacting with one another inside...

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